iPhone 6 Slow Motion Wine Pour 240fps from Osborne Images on Vimeo.

A quick slow motion test of the new Apple iPhone 6.

Moments In Asia - iPhone 5s 120fps from Markus Kontiainen on Vimeo.

Spring 2014 was the best time of my life.

I spent 35 days exploring 11 different cities in Japan, China and Southeast Asia as a work assignment. I had chance to see new places, meet new people and experience new things I had never done before. This is my visual diary of the journey shot entirely on iPhone 5s.

Cities featured in film:

Tokyo
Nikko
Osaka
Ise
Nagoya
Kyoto
Beijing
Singapore
Bangkok
Hanoi
Hongkong
Helsinki

Music: Agnes Obel - Dorian

California from Hal Bergman on Vimeo.

If you’ve got four minutes, I’d love to give you a timelapse tour of all of the most visually stunning places California has to offer, filmed over four years, from coastline to mountains to deserts, from cities to agriculture to national parks.

My Facebook: facebook.com/hal9000 | Flickr: flickr.com/photos/pyrokinetic/
Follow me on Instagram: instagram.com/halbergman | Twitter: twitter.com/pyrokinetic

License these clips for your project on Getty Images: bit.ly/gicalif | Dissolve: bit.ly/dicalif
Magic Window Timelapse Screensaver for Macintosh: bit.ly/mwmac

California is the most populated state in the United States, and the third largest. It’s almost double the size of the United Kingdom and slightly larger than Japan. If it was it’s own independent country (as it was briefly for a few weeks in 1846), it would have the 8th largest economy in the world by GDP. It contains the highest summit and the lowest desert in the Contiguous United States (and the second-lowest point in the world), both of which are in the same county. It’s most known for movies, technology, wine, and national parks, but also grows more than a third of the vegetables consumed in the US, two-thirds of the fruits and nuts, and an unknown but presumably huge percentage of marijuana. It contains every major climatological biome except tundra. More important than those facts, to me, is that I was born and spent most of my life here.

The average clip took 1-3 hours to film and another 3-10 hours to edit. Several cuts are from clips more than 24 hours long. I shot 423 clips over four years to make this, but the majority of the 67 clips ultimately used were shot in the last 12 months.

The music is “Intense Rocks” by Sebastian Watzinger, licensed from Audiosocket.

Most of the individual clips are available for license via Getty Images, Dissolve, or directly. Many of them feature in the Magic Window timelapse screensaver for Mac. Links are now at the top.

(If you got this far down, thank you! I’d like to add that I’m available for hire. I specialize in still photography and timelapse photography for travel, architecture, and industry.)

Full list of locations used:
Alabama Hills
Big Sur
Bombay Beach
Death Valley National Park
Gilroy
Inyo National Forest
Jenner
Joshua Tree
Lake Tahoe
Long Beach
Los Angeles
Malibu
Mono Lake South Tufa Reserve
Mount Shasta
Napa
Onyx
Owens Lake
Salinas
San Diego
San Francisco
San Luis Obispo
Santa Monica
Sequoia National Forest
Venice
Weldon
Yosemite National Park

Dynamic Scotland from Roger Jackaman on Vimeo.

facebook.com/Dynamic.Scotland

Short timelapse project shot mainly around Edinburgh but includes some scenes from further north in the Glencoe area.

Quentin Tarantino // Every Death from Jaume R. Lloret on Vimeo.

Every death in Quentin Tarantino movies.

List of films:

- Reservoir Dogs (1992)
- Pulp Fiction (1994)
- Jackie Brown (1997)
- Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003)
- Kill Bill Vol. 2 (2004)
- Death Proof (2007)
- Inglorious Basterds (2009)
- Django Unchained (2012)

Music: Didn’t I (Blow your mind this time) - The Delfonics

Edited by Jaume R. Lloret

Enter Pyongyang from JT Singh on Vimeo.

“Enter Pyongyang” is another stunning collaboration between city-­branding pioneer JT Singh and flow-motion videographer Rob Whitworth. Blending time-lapse photography, acceleration and slow motion, HD and digital animation, they have produced a cutting‐edge panorama of a city hardly known, but one emerging on the visitor’s landscape as North Korea’s opening unfolds.

North Korea was the last country seemingly immune to change—but no longer. Recent years have witnessed mobile phone penetration, a surge in tourists, and even a marathon. Numerous special economic zones have been launched in cooperation with China, Russia, and South Korea, with railways planned linking all countries in the region. “Enter Pyongyang” captures not just the city, but this dynamism and sense of potential.

This video is the single most significant multi-­media contribution to transcending clichés about North Korea as a society defined by reclusiveness and destitution. To travel there is to witness a proud civilization, though one caught in a Cold War time-warp. Korean cultural traditions are meticulously preserved and displayed in authentic richness. Anyone who has witnessed the awe-inspiring Mass Games knows that, with great sacrifice, North Koreans can pull off a performance unparalleled in its precision.

“Enter Pyongyang” captures the reality of North Korean citizens as earnest and humane, not automatons. The infamous traffic ladies and subway guards stand stiff and sentinel—but today they share a smile too. The more North Koreans one meets, the more one sees an organic society that wants to be a normal country. If you travel there not to judge but to appreciate, you will come away with a better understanding of how challenging national transformation can be.

"Enter Pyongyang" is above all an invitation to explore. Few places in the world have been as hermetically sealed as North Korea, but Koryo Tours has made it possible not just to see North Korea but to engage with it in ways that were impossible until very recently. This is a window of opportunity not to be missed. If Pyongyang is no longer off limits, no place is.

—Foreword by Dr. Parag Khanna, Director, Hybrid Reality

Koryo Group: The Koryo team brought a wealth of valuable knowledge and expertise to this project. Thanks to their extensive experience in running tourism and cultural engagement projects in North Korea since 1993, we were able to get unprecedented access in Pyongyang. We are thankful to the Koryo team and their Korean partners for an unforgettable experience.

FAQs

-How were you guys allowed to film in Pyongyang?

This project was produced in conjunction with Koryo Tours, the leading North Korea travel specialist. Vicky Mohieddeen of Koryo Tours was with us throughout the shoot.

-Were there restrictions on what was allowed to be filmed?

We were closely assisted by two guides from the National Tourism Administration, who helped us gain special access to locations and made sure that we followed all the rules. As is standard for all foreign visitors to the country, we were not allowed to shoot any construction sites, undeveloped locations or military personnel. Other than that we were given relatively free reign.

-Isn’t this all fake? You don’t see the real North Korea.

The average visitor to Pyongyang is likely to be surprised by the scenes they encounter and are especially surprised about how clean and orderly the city actually is. Indeed, people living in Pyongyang and other major cities enjoy a higher quality of life than those in other parts of the county.

-Are people allowed to travel to North Korea?

Yes, despite what the majority of people think, it is possible to visit North Korea as a tourist. North Korea does not release official data on the number of Western tourists it receives, but estimates range from 4,000 to 6,000 per year. Most of the foreign tourists are from Mainland China, estimated in the tens of thousands annually.

-Were you paid to make this film?

We volunteered for this project with no pay at all. All other travel expenses for the 6 day trip were covered by Koryo Tours.

-Does this film support the DPRK government?

"Enter Pyongyang" is an observational film. At no point did Koryo Tours or we have to pretend to be supporters of the DPRK Government or their philosophy in order to be granted permission to shoot this film. Amazingly, we were given complete editorial control in the making of this piece.

Tom Day (Music)
Website: tomday.me
Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/tomday

JT Singh
Website: jtsingh.com/
Facebook: facebook.com/jtssingh
Twitter: twitter.com/jtssingh

Rob Whitworth
Website: robwhitworth.co.uk/
Facebook: facebook.com/RobWhitworthPhotography
Twitter: twitter.com/kwhi02

Koryo Tours
Website: koryogroup.com
Facebook: facebook.com/koryotours
Twitter: twitter.com/koryotours